Phantom Kiss (Chicagoland Vampires, 12.5)


I don’t normally read novellas, I’m not sure why but I usually don’t. I think the reason I decided to read this one is because I know this series is coming to an end and I absolutely love this series. But this book was too short. 

Phantom Kiss

Author: Chloe Neill
Published: January 19, 2017
Pages: 80

Stars: 3 out of 5

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Other Books in this Series I have Reviewed:
Midnight Marked (Chicagoland Vampires, #12)


Vampires generally aren’t afraid of things that go bump in the night, but Merit and Ethan are extra jumpy after a recent attack by a dark sorcerer. So when they learn that someone is messing with graves in Chicago’s cemeteries, stealing skulls and snatching souls, they fear that their powerful foe might be back for even more magical vengeance.

But after a specter begins haunting Cadogan House—and targeting vampires—they realize that their being taunted by an altogether different sort of monster. A ghoulish villain straight out of the Windy City’s urban legends is on the prowl—and he won’t stop until he’s killed again…

Phantom Kiss offers a more intimate glimpse into Ethan and Merits romantic life, which I loved! The book opens with Merit and Ethan’s engagement party. And we all know how much Merit enjoys a good party, especially one involving her family. But the night quickly turns from a social party to one of business when they find out graves are being disturbed and ghosts are being summoned. I had a hard time seeing why Merit and Ethan would be called about this. I know it was explained in the book, but I guess I’m having a hard time making the connection. 

The rest of the book goes by quickly. Did I mention this book was too short? I didn’t love the book but that’s mostly because of the short length. Phantom Kiss included most of the characters that Chicagoland Vampires fans love and didn’t contain anything essential to the overall plot of this series. Again, not something I would buy but something that was pleasant to read. 


Deadly Descendant (Nikki Glass, #2)


I didn’t like this book as much as the first. This book had a good dose of Nikki making some stupid choices that make you want to yell at her.. I’m not sure I’m done with the series but I wasn’t as impressed with this book.

Deadly Descendant

Author: Jenna Black
Published: April 24, 2012
Pages: 355

Stars: 3 out of 5

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Other Books in this Series:
Dark Descendant (Nikki Glass, #1)

As a living descendant of Artemis the Huntress, private investigator Nikki Glass knows how to track someone down. But when an Oracle shows up, warning the Descendants about wild dog attacks in Washington, D.C., Nikki is afraid it might be a trap. The Olympians believe the “dogs” are really jackals, controlled by a blood-crazed descendant of the Egyptian death-god Anubis. Whatever. . . . If Nikki hopes to muzzle Dogboy, she’s got to catch him in the act. But when she stakes out a local cemetery, she ends up face-to-snout with a snarling pack of shadow-jackals whose bite is worse than their bark. These hellhounds are deadly—even for an immortal like Nikki. “Dog” spelled backward may be “god,” but that won’t stop Nikki from teaching these old gods some new tricks. Like playing dead.

As we know from book one in this series, Nikki is a descendent of Artemis. So in other words, she has perfect accuracy with any weapon and can almost turn anything into a weapon. She is also known for her ability to track down people who don’t want to be or can’t be found. Anderson is one scary guy. A God of destruction and vengeance, he is capable of killing any Liberi. So when he manipulates Nikki into reviewing records to make sure the people he has hidden are truly that, she can’t say no. Unfortunately it isn’t long before the Liberi are tasked with finding one of their own, another Liberi,  and stopping him from killing any more innocent. 

I felt like Nikki was a little harsh with how she felt about Emma. Although Emma has gone through hell, she criticizes every move she makes. There’s a possibility she’s right about Emma manipulating Anderson. But I think some slack is due. Things between Jamaal and Nikki change from him hating her to them finding a commonality, maybe even the beginning of a relationship. But Nikki’s attraction to Jamaal is confusing and complicated. When he surprises her with a kiss, she makes the encounter awkward and refuses to kiss him back. I just don’t get it. She has made numerous comments about how attractive he is and how much she likes him, but then she pushes him away. I guess I just don’t understand the reasoning behind it. As things progress in the book, Nikki’s reaction to Jamaal changes. 

I didn’t like this book as much as the first. There was a lot of repetition of information. And the plot had some noticeable holes. There were things in this book that irritated me – For example, the team is worries about people hearing Nikki’s gun shots when tracking the Jackle. Has no one heard of a silencer? With money not being an issue, I would think getting a high performance, powerful, but silent gun would be no problem. And Nikki’s character is starting to get on my nerves. The saying ‘self fulfilling prophecy’ circled around my mind while reading the book. I’m still going to give the third book in this series a try. Hopefully it’s better 

Someone Like You (Oxford #3)


Author: Lauren Layne
Published: December 6, 2016
Pages: 228

Stars: 3 out of 5

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Links to Other Books in Series:
Irresistibly Yours
I Wish you Were Mine (Oxford, #2)

Lincoln Mathis doesn’t hide his reputation as Manhattan’s ultimate playboy. In fact, he cultivates it. But behind every flirtatious smile, each provocative quip, there’s a secret that Lincoln’s hiding from even his closest friends—a tragedy from his past that holds his heart quietly captive. Lincoln knows what he wants: someone like Daisy Sinclair, the sassy, off-limits bridesmaid he can’t take his eyes off at his best friend’s wedding. He also knows that she’s everything he can never have.

After a devastating divorce, Daisy doesn’t need anyone to warn her off the charming best man at her sister’s wedding. One look at the breathtakingly hot Lincoln Mathis and she knows that he’s exactly the type of man she should avoid. But when Daisy stumbles upon Lincoln’s secret, she realizes there’s more to the charming playboy than meets the eye. And suddenly Daisy and Lincoln find their lives helplessly entwined in a journey that will either heal their damaged souls . . . or destroy them forever.

You know what they say about forbidden fruit.. Well, that’s Daisy. Emma’s identical twin sister. She is tough, gorgeous, and broken. Lincoln on the other hand is a tight box of secrets. Secrets even his friends don’t know about. But somehow Daisy is able to uncover these secrets within days of knowing him. Lincoln is the flirt, the kind of guy who can easily put a room at ease. If you’ve read the previous two books in this series, then you know just how good looking Lincoln is. But like Daisy, Lincoln is broken. This book is about finding the courage to fix what’s broken. 

One thing both Lincoln and Daisy have in common is the masks they wear and hide behind. When both Lincoln and Daisy meet, the encounter is both flirtatious with an acknowledgment of the walls or boundaries each other put up. Not at all what I expected in the opening chapter. 

The tone of this book is heavy and the chapters are tinged with sadness as you turn each page, waiting to discover the hidden secret. And when it comes, there is no triumphant moment. Because Lincoln’s secret is heartbreaking. Part one of the book is mostly heartbreaking. The ending brought tears to my eyes. 

Part two of the book starts off on a lighter note. I found myself smiling and enjoying the possibilities to come. But then we get a closer look into Daisy’s secrets and I find myself feeling a mix of hope and sadness. I honestly can say part two flew and by the end I had mix feelings. I really wish I could say more here, but that would be giving too much away. 

The rest of the book flows in a similar way, happy moments sometimes tinged with sadness. The sex scenes are hot and fun. And as far as Lincoln goes, there is only so much understanding I can give. Simply put, he messed up. And I don’t think I would be as understanding as Daisy. There was one scene at the end of the book with Kate’s voice (can’t say more without giving too much away) that had me rolling my eyes. 

Overall I enjoyed the book but this wasn’t my favorite book in this series. I probably won’t ever buy this book because it’s more of the read it once and that’s enough. The book just had too much sadness and not enough sassy banter.

Dirty For Me (Motor City Royals, #1)

Author: Jackie Ashenden
Published: July 26, 2016
Pages: 288

Stars: 3.5 out of 5

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Ezekiel “Zee” Chase has a complicated past. Born into a family whose wealth grew from the seedy world of big-time crime, he ran away as a teenager and made a home for himself on the streets of Detroit. By day, the mechanic works at a local garage. But by night, he throws down with the best of them in Detroit’s gritty underground fighting scene. With all those muscles, he’s never had trouble with women–until he meets one who challenges him to the greatest fight of his life. . .

Tamara Eliot is a hardworking corporate high-flyer who appreciates the finer things in life, from her expensive perfume to her designer handbags. More than anything, though, she likes to be in control–and when Zee explodes into her life, she feels anything but. He’s the definition of a bad boy: brash, fiery, and of course, irresistibly hot. And there’s a darkness about him that keeps her coming back for more. As Zee takes Tamara deeper into a world she never knew existed, she just might prove to be the one opponent he won’t be able to dominate–at least not without some pleasurable convincing . . .

The book opens up with the introduction of Zee. The way the author describes him is both scary and sexy. He is a mix of power, confidence, and intimidation. His description is captivating and draws the reader in.

On the other hand, Tamara doesn’t seem as interesting or captivating. At least not at first. She is an intern at her families company and enjoys the finer things in life. Although she seems to have a great life, she is board and unhappy.

Once Tamara and Zee begin to interact, the attraction between them is intense. But Zee isn’t exactly Prince Charming. He is demanding, crude, and somehow still sexy! The sex scenes, as you can imagine, are intense and hot. But the scenes that followed and sometimes led up to these were stuffy. The characters were too much in their own heads and often said the same thing over and over again.

Even though the ending was cheesy, I did enjoy this book.  It’s a quick and entertaining read. Probably not a book I would rush out to buy or want to read again. But for a one time read, it wasn’t bad.


One With You (Crossfire, #5)

One with You

Author: Sylvia Day
Published: April 5, 2016
Pages: 464

Stars: 3 out of 5


Links to buy:
$9.99 Amazon
$9.99 Barnes&Noble



Gideon Cross. Falling in love with him was the easiest thing I’ve ever done. It happened instantly. Completely. Irrevocably.

Marrying him was a dream come true. Staying married to him is the fight of my life. Love transforms. Ours is both a refuge from the storm and the most violent of tempests. Two damaged souls entwined as one.

We have bared our deepest, ugliest secrets to one another. Gideon is the mirror that reflects all my flaws … and all the beauty I couldn’t see. He has given me everything. Now, I must prove I can be the rock, the shelter for him that he is for me. Together, we could stand against those who work so viciously to come between us.

But our greatest battle may lie within the very vows that give us strength. Committing to love was only the beginning. Fighting for it will either set us free … or break us apart.


This book was better than I thought. Since the release, I have read reviews that put the book near the middle of the road. And for the most part, I would have to agree. For me, the repetition of what Gideon and Eva say was slightly annoying and I felt like it was something the author did to fill the space. The same goes for the plot. I felt the plot was similar to a conversation that crept along at a leisurely pace. My thoughts on reasons behind doing this range from the plot not having enough substance to stand on its own to the author wanting to incorporate an overview of the series. What I mean by this is the author would highlight scenes from previous books in this series as something the characters looked back on or commented on how they grew.

The author did a wonderful job of staying true to her characters. I wouldn’t go as far as saying the characters grew on an individual level but they did develop as far as their relationship is concerned. I wouldn’t say the developments in Eva and Gideon’s relationship was jaw dropping insightful or suspenseful. It was in ways predictable and  slightly uneventful.

Overall, I am glad I read this book. The author does a nice job wrapping everything up and tying loose ends. If you have been keeping up with this series, you will enjoy reading this book. It’s provides the perfect closure for these loved characters.

The Exiled Seven (The Exiled Series, #1)

The Exiled Seven

Author: Blake Renworth
Published: May 12, 2016
Pages: 340

Stars: 3 out of 5

Amazon $2.99
Barnes&Noble $2.99



I had the privilege to read this book along side rakioddbooks. I haven’t done a buddy read in a while and I miss it! It was so much fun being able to discuss details of the book that you can’t really talk about in fear of saying too much or spoiling the plot. If you are interested in doing a buddy read, I would love to do another one. In the meantime, check out her review for this books here.

When Alariq is exiled from his home city-state for a crime he did not commit, only six stand by his side, convinced of his innocence and steadfast in their loyalty.

The seven dwarfs must set out from Ishtara to look for a new place to call home, but in doing so, they make a discovery that puts them all in danger. They are rescued and taken in by a mysterious and beautiful outsider, who lives alone in the depths of Loraheem Forest. What follows is Alariq’s struggle to come to terms with his exile, as those around him seek to make a place for themselves in this new life. Soon, however, it becomes clear their situation is more complex than they initially realized, and they begin to wonder if there is more behind Alariq’s exile than simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Told in a unique storyteller voice, this reversal and reimagining of the classic fairy tale explores the themes of shattering betrayal, the subsequent struggle to trust again, and the basic desire to take control of one’s own destiny.

I loved the first couple of chapters in this book. The way the author talks to the reader while opening the story is fun and in a way a unique approach. In many ways, by doing this the author has given himself a voice within his book. And although I really liked this in the beginning, I found the deeper I got into the plot or chapters the more I didn’t care for it. It’s not that it truly bugs me or anything. It’s just that it takes me out of the story, ever so slightly, but nonetheless it feels like a break from the plot. Almost like the author feels a need to rationalize something or reassure the reader of what is happening or about to happen.

As you dig deeper into the story, the plot unfolds effortlessly and you can easily image the world these dwarfs live in. Right away we are introduced to Alariq and discover he is banished for a crime he didn’t commit. Alariq believes his friends, although loyal in their beliefs of his innocence, foolishly follow him into banishment. Full of regrets and wishing for home, the dwarfs follow a lost Alariq in hopes of settling into a new home. But what they find may be more than they bargained for.

I was surprised how quickly I started to like Alariq. In many ways this feeling snuck up on me and I didn’t even realize how protective I became of his character until the human girl (Tianna) showed up. When she started having power struggles with him, I automatically hated her. Which doesn’t make any sense because she actually saved him and his friends. The more I thought about it, a lot of what goes on between Tianna and Alariq didn’t really make much sense. For the majority of the time they are at odds with each other and just crabby. But there wasn’t really any reason why they were this way. Another thing that was inconsistent or odd was even though everyone unofficially nominated Alariq as the leader of the group, a lot of the decisions he made caused an uproar between everyone. And instead of following his lead, there was a lot of questioning, doubt, and dirty looks. I think I was expecting the leader wouldn’t be questioned as much.

Tianna, although small, can defend herself quite well. Her skills in disappearing and blending into her surroundings is impressive. Actually everything about her character is impressive. The way she is described, it is as if she has no flaws. She is the fastest, best shot, knows most of the answers, and has an attitude to match. I can’t say I cared for Tianna’s character. Simply put, she isn’t realistic and seems too perfect. And for me, that’s just not very appealing.

Overall, the book was interesting and I enjoyed where the author took the plot. The world building was great. As each scene unfolded, I could easily picture everything that happened and what it looked like. For me, This book was entertaining, a nice read that was different from my norm. But ultimately I didn’t love the book and found I wasn’t as invested in the characters or what happened within the story. You don’t learn much about any of the supporting characters which makes it difficult to sympathize with them. The book didn’t have much dialogue and the entire time I was reading I felt more like an outsider watching a movie.

If you are a lover of The Hobbit or Lord of the Rings, I would give this book a chance. It might be just what you are looking for.


Once Upon a One Night Stand (Lover, #1)

Once Upon

Author: D.N. Hola
Published: May 29, 2016
Pages: 204

Stars: 3 out of 5

Where to Buy:
$2.99 Kindle





Five friends. Five stories.

Welcome to the LOVER show. Let’s begin with L:

Have you ever tried not liking a guy when your best friends decide you should like him? How about if that guy had the sexiest ass on the planet, and was your birthday-cake one-night-stand with icing on top?

London Reeves agrees that three years is a long time to live without sex, but one steamy hot night could never last longer than the morning after. Yet, her four lunatic best friends disagree on that last one. The voices in her head disagree, too, and even her mother seems to think she’s crazy. And sexyass will not take a goddamn no for an answer. Now what exactly is a girl to do against that?

London is a little odd. She visualizes voices in her head as replicas of herself that have one feeling. For example there is one for happy, angry.. You get the idea. But once you get used to this, there are times it is funny but mostly it easily fades into the background. Almost like it is the most normal thing in the world.. I know, strange right?

London, is on a dry spell and is stuck in the ‘friends’ zone with the guy she loves- Carter. So when she meets sexy Liam at a bar, she lets lose. And WHOA, what a one night stand!! This part of the book was sexy, fun and if I had to classify it as anything it would be entitled- Marathon Sex! But London is an emotional roller coaster and at times it was difficult to identify with her juvenile antics. To be honest, I did’t really like her character in the beginning. But surprisingly, she grew on me and near the second half of the book, I didn’t want to put it down.

Liam is hot. There is just no other words for it. He is sweat, flirtatious, and fun. But he has some major flaws that pushed me away from his character. Without giving away anything all I can say is I didn’t like how he was willing to jump to ‘the next best thing’ at the first sign of distress. But I liked how he stood up for himself when he discovered what was behind London’s antics and how she wasn’t all in.

I know that last paragraph is a little confusing but I can’t say more without giving away some of the plot twists. Overall, the book was a fun read. The characters grow on you and by the end of the book you don’t want to put it down.