Bossman

Bossman

 

 

Author: Vi Keeland
Published: July 16, 2016
Pages: 319

Stars: 4 out of 5

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Synopsis:
The first time I met Chase Parker, I didn’t exactly make a good impression. I was hiding in the bathroom hallway of a restaurant, leaving a message for my best friend to save me from my awful date. He overheard and told me I was a bitch, then proceeded to offer me some dating advice. So I told him to mind his own damn business―his own tall, gorgeous, full-of-himself damn business―and went back to my miserable date. When he walked by my table, he smirked, and I watched his arrogant, sexy ass walk back to his date.

I couldn’t help but sneak hidden glances at the condescending jerk on the other side of the room. Of course, he caught me on more than one occasion, and winked. When the gorgeous stranger and his equally hot date suddenly appeared at our table, I thought he was going to rat me out. But instead, he pretended we knew each other and joined us―telling elaborate, embarrassing stories about our fake childhood.

My date suddenly went from boring to bizarrely exciting. When it was over and we parted ways, I thought about him more than I would ever admit, even though I knew I’d never see him again. I mean, what were the chances I’d run into him again in a city with eight million people?Then again…

What were the chances a month later he’d wind up being my new sexy boss?

Review:
The book opens up with a funny but awkward first date gone bad and this is where we meet Reese and Chase. Reese is a young woman who is sassy but sweet. Chase is  an attractive man with the confidence to match his looks. And somehow he is also the guy who saves Reese from a boring date. The stories he tells are laugh out loud embarrassing. But by the end of the first chapter, I was unsure with the characters departure. They each came with a date but the hug Chase gives Reese is an insight on the sexual tension between the two. 

Four weeks later and the two meet again. I must confess, the writing isn’t the best but the dialogue is fantastic. I have not laughed over a book like this in so long. I will say, Chase’s hugs in the beginning of the book are strangely intimate for two people who technically know nothing about each other. 

As the book progresses, some of what happens is predictable but I wasn’t exactly sure which direction the author was going to take once Chase and Reese got together. The ending wasn’t my favorite and I think Reese deserved a little better than what she got. But still, the ending was fun. The epilogue was great. The one complaint I have is the book just stopped. I didn’t feel like there was a true ending. Everything was moving along, you turn the page to find the answer and instead of an answer you get the end of the book.. Seriously! It would have taken three more lines to bring closer to this book but the author decides to just end it. 

Walking away from this book, I really enjoyed it. I really needed the laugh and let’s not forget about the sexy banter between Reese and Chase. God, I absolutely loved it! Don’t get me wrong, there are some real cheesy scenes and a few cringe worthy ones. So buyer beware. This book was probably a solid 3Star book. But the timing was perfect and that added the extra star.

The Glittering Court (The Glittering Court, #1)

Glittering Court

Author: Richelle Mead
Published: April 5, 2016
Pages: 400

Stars: 2 out of 5

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Synopsis:
Big and sweeping, spanning from the refined palaces of Osfrid to the gold dust and untamed forests of Adoria, The Glittering Court tells the story of Adelaide, an Osfridian countess who poses as her servant to escape an arranged marriage and start a new life in Adoria, the New World. But to do that, she must join the Glittering Court.

Both a school and a business venture, the Glittering Court is designed to transform impoverished girls into upper-class ladies who appear destined for powerful and wealthy marriages in the New World. Adelaide naturally excels in her training, and even makes a few friends: the fiery former laundress Tamsin and the beautiful Sirminican refugee Mira. She manages to keep her true identity hidden from all but one: the intriguing Cedric Thorn, son of the wealthy proprietor of the Glittering Court.

When Adelaide discovers that Cedric is hiding a dangerous secret of his own, together they hatch a scheme to make the best of Adelaide’s deception. Complications soon arise—first as they cross the treacherous seas from Osfrid to Adoria, and then when Adelaide catches the attention of a powerful governor.

But no complication will prove quite as daunting as the potent attraction simmering between Adelaide and Cedric. An attraction that, if acted on, would scandalize the Glittering Court and make them both outcasts in wild, vastly uncharted lands…

Review:
This book is about freedom and getting a second chance. The book opens up to an arranged marriage. The lead heroine is arranged to marry her boring and pathetically unremarkable cousin Barron Belshire. Even though She never expected to marry for love, she wasn’t sure she could marry her cousin. Well, that is she wasn’t sure she could handle his controlling mother. As the weeks pass, things don’t appear to be getting better. And thus bringing the reader to the introduction of the glittering courts. 

Glittering courts was founded to help bring more women, proper women, over to Adoria. I will admit, I can see the desire the glittering courts bring, the adventure and opportunity of a new life. As the book continues, I was periodically reminded of the similarities in plots to the selection series. Although the girls aren’t competing for a crown,they are competing for marriage. The competition isn’t as cut-throat but it’s nonetheless a completion where the main character is acting and hiding secrets. 

Cedric runs the Glittering Courts with his father and uncle. But he has many secrets. I wasn’t too impressed with Cedric. His character was thin and didn’t seem to have much to offer beyond looks and charm. I found his character frustrating for most of the second half of the book. He either needed to act on his feelings or leave things alone. I hate the in between game that is being played. 

Adelaide’s character was equally frustrating and I thought her character lacked depth as well. She came off as strong yet spoiled, saying she wants freedom but when faced with the opportunity she falls short. 

Warren seems like a nice enough guy. Kind of clumsy and rash but logistically, a good match for Adelaide. But the reasoning behind Adelaide not wanting him at first seemed pointless and ridiculous. As the book went on, Warren came off more as a closed minded and spoiled. 

The plot wasn’t extremely captivating and overall the book was alright. I found myself underwhelmed for most of the book and considered not finishing it. 

Practice Makes Perfect

Practice makes perfect


Author
: Julie James
Published: March 3, 2009
Pages: 291

Stars: 1 out of 5

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Synopsis:
Behind closed doors, they’re laying down the law.

When it comes to the laws of attraction…

Payton Kendall and J.D. Jameson are lawyers who know the meaning of objection. A feminist to the bone, Payton has fought hard to succeed in a profession dominated by men. Born wealthy, privileged, and cocky, J.D. has fought hard to ignore her. Face-to-face, they’re perfectly civil. They have to be. For eight years they have kept a safe distance and tolerated each other as coworkers for one reason: to make partner at the firm.

…There are no rules.

But all bets are off when they’re asked to join forces on a major case. Though apprehensive at first, they begin to appreciate each other’s dedication to the law—and the sparks between them quickly turn into attraction. But the increasingly hot connection does not last long when they discover that only one of them will be named partner. Now it’s an all-out war. And the battle between the sexes is bound to make these lawyers hot under the collar…

Review:
Payton has a secret crush on her co-worker. The same co-worker who is also fighting for the same partnership she is. J.D is attractive but he’s sexist. His ideas on feminism and equality are far from reality. This characteristic makes his character highly unattractive. To add to this, J.D relationship with his Dad is a constant struggle. 

The writing style seemed choppy and I struggled to really get into the book. I found myself skimming a lot of what was written, wondering when I would get to the interesting part. I think the thing that bugged me about this book was the direction the plot took and the exaggerated characteristics of Payton and J.D. 

This book wasn’t for me. 

The Perilous Sea (The Elemental Trilogy, #2)

the perilous sea

 

Author: Sherry Thomas
Published: September 16, 2014
Pages: 414

Stars: 5 out of 5

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Synopsis:
After spending the summer away from each other, Titus and Iolanthe (still disguised as Archer Fairfax) are eager to return to Eton College to resume their training to fight the Bane. Although no longer bound to Titus by a blood oath, Iolanthe is more committed than ever to fulfilling her destiny—especially with the agents of Atlantis quickly closing in.

Soon after arriving at school, though, Titus makes a shocking discovery, one that makes him question everything he previously believed about their mission. Faced with this devastating realization, Iolanthe is forced to come to terms with her new role, while Titus must choose between following his mother’s prophecies—and forging a divergent path to an unknowable future.

Review:

The first chapter grabs the readers attention but I was not exactly sure what was going on. Like with most series, months or maybe even a year has past since I have read the previous book. And for me, when I saw this book was available, I felt excitement and wanted to read it right away. The description of the book reminded me who the characters were and the overall plot. But I couldn’t remember how the last book ended. And starting the book out with the main character having no memory who who they are, doesn’t help. Luckily the following chapters fill in the gap.

The chapters go back and forth between the Sahara desert- where Titus and Iolanthe (Fairfax) have lost their memory and aren’t sure why they are there, to the past – which describe the events leading up to the Sahara desert and memory loss. Reading the chapters of when Titus and Iolanthe don’t have their memories is fascinating. In a way, it is very similar to the first book- the emotions, the connection between them, and the slow development of respect, companionship, and more. But I will admit, I am drawn to the romance. Titus is so sweet and Iolanthe is perfect for him. This series really is turning into an addiction. The author did an amazing job with developing deep characters.

One of the hiccups in Titus and Iolanthe’s relationship is an important discovery. I wish I could expand on this but honestly I think it would be giving too much away. But I will say this discovery makes Iolanthe feel betrayed and I have to agree with her. This part of the book made me question- Did the first book not matter? Everything Iolanthe went through, all her sacrifice, everything she has overcome, does it not matter? In the first book Iolanthe killed the Bane in the crucible. That has to count for something… 

The ending of this book left me with goosebumps!! Talk about a cliffhanger. I can’t wait for the next book. The action in this book was intense, the plot fast paced, and the romantic jesters were beautiful. I must agree with the critics, this series is the next big one. 

This book reveals so much, I wish I could say more but I would be spoiling it if I did. But what I can say is how you read Titus’s mothers prophecies in the beginning of the book is not how you look at them, read them, or interpret them later on.

If you haven’t read the first book, you can find my review for it here. Otherwise, happy reading!  

Dirty For Me (Motor City Royals, #1)

dirty-for-me
Author: Jackie Ashenden
Published: July 26, 2016
Pages: 288

Stars: 3.5 out of 5

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Synopsis:
Ezekiel “Zee” Chase has a complicated past. Born into a family whose wealth grew from the seedy world of big-time crime, he ran away as a teenager and made a home for himself on the streets of Detroit. By day, the mechanic works at a local garage. But by night, he throws down with the best of them in Detroit’s gritty underground fighting scene. With all those muscles, he’s never had trouble with women–until he meets one who challenges him to the greatest fight of his life. . .

Tamara Eliot is a hardworking corporate high-flyer who appreciates the finer things in life, from her expensive perfume to her designer handbags. More than anything, though, she likes to be in control–and when Zee explodes into her life, she feels anything but. He’s the definition of a bad boy: brash, fiery, and of course, irresistibly hot. And there’s a darkness about him that keeps her coming back for more. As Zee takes Tamara deeper into a world she never knew existed, she just might prove to be the one opponent he won’t be able to dominate–at least not without some pleasurable convincing . . .

Review:
The book opens up with the introduction of Zee. The way the author describes him is both scary and sexy. He is a mix of power, confidence, and intimidation. His description is captivating and draws the reader in.

On the other hand, Tamara doesn’t seem as interesting or captivating. At least not at first. She is an intern at her families company and enjoys the finer things in life. Although she seems to have a great life, she is board and unhappy.

Once Tamara and Zee begin to interact, the attraction between them is intense. But Zee isn’t exactly Prince Charming. He is demanding, crude, and somehow still sexy! The sex scenes, as you can imagine, are intense and hot. But the scenes that followed and sometimes led up to these were stuffy. The characters were too much in their own heads and often said the same thing over and over again.

Even though the ending was cheesy, I did enjoy this book.  It’s a quick and entertaining read. Probably not a book I would rush out to buy or want to read again. But for a one time read, it wasn’t bad.

 

Sugar Rush (Sugar Bowl, #2)

Sugar Rush
Author
: Sawyer Bennett
Published: August 16, 2016
Pages: 216

Stars: 1 out of 5

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Synopsis:
After posing as an escort for the Sugar Bowl online dating service, Sela Halstead is looking for one thing: payback. She’s closing in on the site’s heartless founder, Jonathon Townsend, and she needs Beckett North, Townsend’s business partner and her lover, by her side. She’d thought that their intimate nights together had forged an unbreakable bond, but after a shocking betrayal, Sela begins to doubt the brilliant bad boy. When push comes to shove, can she trust Beck to do the right thing?

Now that he understands the truth, Beck will stop at nothing to secure the reckoning Sela deserves. But between his desire for her and his disgust for JT, Beck doesn’t exactly have a lot of control over his emotional state. Left with no other choice, he must summon all his discipline to maintain JT’s trust and pretend that they’re still friends. But how far will Beck go to prove his loyalty to Sela? He nearly lost her once. To keep her, Beck might have to kill for her.

Review:
This book picks up right where Sugar Daddy left off. And I’m a bit surprised how quickly Beck puts everything together with Sela’s rape. I’m also surprised with how quickly Sela and Beck resolve everything from the last book. The further I dive into this book, the more disappointed I became. This book wasn’t as captivating as the first book. Although the plot was interesting, it wasn’t as exciting or suspenseful. And honestly, I wasn’t really into this book. It wasn’t long before I started skimming chapters and skipping over sections of the book. Unfortunately, this book just didn’t really hold my attention.

Beck turns from the controlled, dominating man we were first introduced to, to an impulsive and somewhat consumed man. I understand him wanting to help Sela, but the lengths he goes to in this book scream impractical. Let’s be honest, Beck really hasn’t know Sela for long. And beyond sex, they don’t know much about each other. Yet, he drops everything for her. He becomes just as consumed with getting revenge from TJ as Sela was in the first book.

Sela is more controlled and relaxed in this book. Although she has come to the understanding that murdering TJ would be unwise, she is confident in Becks dedication to let him take the lead on getting revenge. And the plan Beck comes up with is costly and not a guarantee.

As the book continues, I found myself becoming more detached and uninterested. I think the thing that really killed the book for me was how unrealistic everything was. I don’t know, maybe if I read this book at a different time then I would have enjoyed it more. But right now I think I need to put the book down and walk away. Maybe I’ll come back to it, maybe I won’t…

My review is not the norm for this book. When considering this book, please look at other reviews. Most people enjoyed the book. I guess I just couldn’t get into it.

 

 

Sugar Daddy (Sugar Bowl, #1)

Sugar Daddy
Author: Sawyer Bennett
Published: May 24, 2016
Pages: 220

Stars: 4.5 out of 5

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Synopsis:
Sela Halstead lost her innocence in a way that no sixteen-year-old should ever have to endure. She’s spent years trying to forget that night even while wondering about the identities of the monsters who brutalized her—until a telltale tattoo flashes across Sela’s TV screen. The incriminating ink belongs to Jonathon Townsend, the millionaire founder of The Sugar Bowl, a website that matches rich older men with impressionable young women. Obsessed with revenge, Sela infiltrates Townsend’s world, only to come face-to-face with a tantalizing complication: Beckett North, his charismatic business partner.

The tech mastermind behind The Sugar Bowl, Beck always gets what he wants, in business and in bed. And yet, for a man who’s done every dirty thing imaginable, there’s something about the naïve, fresh-faced Sela that sparks his hottest fantasies. Because with her, it’s not just about sex. Beck opens up to her in ways he never has with other girls. So why does he get the feeling that she’s hiding something? In a world of pleasure and power, the shocking truth could turn them against each other—or bind them forever.

Review:
I think this book might be a trigger for some people. More so the prologue than the rest of the book. Just something to keep in mind before you begin reading this book.

But Wow, the prologue in this book is not what I expected. It isn’t gritty or over the top. But nonetheless it makes my stomach turn. Although the author doesn’t give extensive details of Sela’s rape, the details that are given is enough to make me sick, angry, and disgusted. I was surprised by the amount and strength of emotion you get from this one section. It screams of self-shaming, desperation, loathing, and so much pain.

Fast forward ten years and Sela remembers one of her rapists- Jonathan Townsend (JT). Which brings us to the introduction of the sugar bowl and Beck. Beck is part owner and programmer behind the sugar bowl. He is also a man who is more interested in having a one night stand than developing any kind of relationship. That is until he meets Sela. Beck is smart, confident, kind, and strong. There is something sweet yet sexy about the way he is both dominating and caring.

Sela is full of pain and only has one thing on her mind- revenge. And she is willing to do anything to achieve this. Even if that means getting close to JT’s partner Beck. But Beck isn’t what she was expecting and slowly he begins to penetrate Sela’s cold heart. Will Sela continue on her path of revenge, risking Becks love and affections? Or is Beck enough to satisfy the revenge Sela desperately wants?

I will admit, it didn’t take me long before I became enthralled with this book. The main theme behind this book is revenge through murder. Yet sex is also an important undertone. In this book, sex is used both for power, pleasure, and pain. The complexity is not what I expected.

As Beck and Sela’s relationship develops further, I’m torn with how I feel. Part of me wishes Sela would give up her need for revenge and just let Beck lover her. The other part considers her a lose canine and wonders when she will plunge into a depression. I actually considered putting the book down half way in because I knew the plot was ready to turn and I wasn’t sure if I would like the way things changed. But of course I couldn’t put the book down. And the ending, wow, talk about intense. The build up was almost stressful to read. I won’t give anything away but the ending was not how I thought it would end. I cannot wait for the second book.

The only thing I wish this book had was the backstory of Sela’s rape. She writes in her journal that she deserved this and I know this is a common feeling for rape victims. But the author doesn’t really go into much detail about what lead up to the rape.

Overall, I enjoyed this book. I would say it is worth your time to pick up and read.